Padlet- The collaborative wall!

Padlet is an app that can be used in lots of different ways. This could be in a 1-to-1 situation, or the teacher could use a projector to show the class a bulletin board you create. Share the URL/QR code with the class have the children answer a discussion question, work on a “Do Now” activity, or even create an exit slip to show learning. I have even seen it used as a way of showing learning made during a topic, the class filled in a collective project at the start and then at the end of a unit to show progress made.  I have used it to create a bank of sentences as a class which can then be used in later writing e.g. how would describe… and then the children create sentences, I prefer three each, and this can be ‘magpied’ when they create a piece of writing.

Another idea is to use Padlet as a tool for small group projects. The teacher could divide the class into small groups and have the children work together at home to research a particular subject — for example, the Euros, Olympics or even the Romans. Each student could devote their research to a type of media supported by Padlet (video, audio, photo, or text), add it to their group’s shared wall, and then present the findings in class.

There are dozens of online bulletin board sites out there, but Padlet is one of the more intuitive, and probably most appealing to kids. The colourful backgrounds and customisation options let children add some personality to walls. The drag-and-drop interface is  smooth and easy to use. The depth of the site depends on what you put into it; it’s basically a blank page, but Padlet gives support and has examples of best use.

Children write a few sentences each and the class ends up with a paragraph.

Children write a few sentences each and the class ends up with a paragraph.

Padlet walls are great for study groups, class projects, and discussions. Classmates and friends can collaborate successfully on shared walls for study or fun, too — just keep an eye on them. Padlet gives students a lot of freedom to explore interests online and save that info in an organised manner. Whether it’s school- or fun-related, children get to create a space of their own.

All in all, Padlet gives students their own little corner of the Internet to collect and save information in a simple, fun and collaborative manner. It’s beyond easy to use, the interface is intuitive, and help is available around every corner. However, be aware that walls are semi-private by default, meaning there’s an extra step involved in ensuring total privacy for users.

Thanks for Reading,

Adam Chase.


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